Application of the “Fat-but-Fit” paradigm in predicting 10-yr risk for an atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) event using the pooled cohort risk equations among US adults

  • Paul D. Loprinzi
    Correspondence
    Center for Health Behavior Research, School of Applied Sciences, Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, 229 Turner Center, University, MS 38677 Oxford, MS, United States.
    Affiliations
    Center for Health Behavior Research, School of Applied Sciences, Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, United States
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Published:September 22, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.09.057
      The “Fat-but-Fit” paradigm [
      • McAuley P.A.
      • Blair S.N.
      Obesity paradoxes.
      ] is supported by accumulating research [
      • Blair S.N.
      • Brodney S.
      Effects of physical inactivity and obesity on morbidity and mortality: current evidence and research issues.
      ,
      • Loprinzi P.
      • Smit E.
      • Lee H.
      • Crespo C.
      • Andersen R.
      • Blair S.N.
      The “fit but fat” paradigm addressed using accelerometer-determined physical activity data.
      ] demonstrating that meeting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) guidelines (≥150 min/week [
      • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
      Physical activity guidelines for Americans.
      ]) may help to counteract cardiovascular consequences (e.g., elevated inflammation) associated with being overweight and obesity. In alignment with this, overweight or obese individuals who are fit/active tend to have morbidity and mortality rates that are at least as low, and in some cases lower, than normal weight individuals who are unfit/inactive [
      • Lee C.D.
      • Jackson A.S.
      • Blair S.N.
      US weight guidelines: is it also important to consider cardiorespiratory fitness?.
      ].

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